Unfulfilled promises that grind my gears.

It’s becoming a Monthly discussion. Grassy brings up fall out and we start arguments about player expectations. He sees Fallout as completely open but something like GTA as too restrictive. The deciding factor is the fact that GTA has so many buildings and the ones you are able to explore are very limited. For Grassy at least, That alone is able to turn the game into a jacket two sizes too small.

I don’t have much against the limitations of Games. Budget and time only allow so much to be open. It’s not a disappointment to me that, while playing Skyrim, I wouldn’t be able to take a quite morning outside crocheting or building a steam engine.

What can quickly make me start considering a game’s options to have as much stretching room as a southwest center seat, is when a game doesn’t warn when an option is going to disappear.

Bioshock says no, that gun I have been upgrading is now useless because it doesn’t have a red ribbon at the end. Yes, my old gun is mechanically the same and has money put into it but too bad. I have to switch and start upgrading a new gun because head shots don’t do the same amount of damage to the new more human, humans.

Deus ex, at least before the update, says no, there is no way to non-lethally kill this boss. Even though the game gave every option in the few hours I played before this point.

That moment was more then upsetting to me. I had slowly and very enjoyably, managed to make my way through the areas without notice. Then I got to the boss.

Had I read anything about the game, I’d know that the first boss is disproportionately difficult then the game up until that point and for a good while after.

The difficulty wasn’t the issue for me. I wanted to maintain my non-lethal status. After about an hour of trying to win the fight without actually killing him. I decided to look it up. Nope, no way to achieve my goal. So I tasered and shotgun him till he died.

Adam then decided to take it a step further, and stuff a grenade down the bosses throat, with a smirk in his face. Blowing his head clean off.

Game violence as a whole doesn’t phase me much. What put sand up my butt crack was the betrayal. I had gone out of my way to make it to this point without killing or even being seen. The game rewarded me with character comments pointing out that my Adam was not a cold blooded killer. Until he was, and for no other reason then the game decided so.

Oblivion did this same thing to me. I worked on sneak and made my way with a knife and nothing else. That is, until I got to a fight that mattered. The area gave no option to sneak up to him. My super, once a day, turn invisible to everyone move was useless. The boss would just stand next to me waiting to de-cloak.

There simply has to be a way to let the player know a head of time, the hard limitations of a class decision. At least let us know when an option is simply off the table.

These situations are always worst in games where you are creating your own character. They take a moment of immersion and break it as abruptly as a sneeze in the face as you lean in for the kiss.

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